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Penang trishaw: long wait for customers

It has been said that a holiday in Penang would be incomplete without an old fashion ride in Penang trishaw. The beca, as locals call the Penang trishaw, allows visitors to explore parts of the island at a leisurely pace and in an eco-friendly fashion.


But all is not well in the beca sector. A chat with beca riders revealed that the current economic recession is affecting business. Fewer visitors to the island are taking the vehicle to see the sights. Time was when hordes of tourists from all over the world particularly Taiwan, Japan and Europe would go for a drive.


Beca riders made between RM30 and RM40 daily before the current downturn. They consider themselves fortunate if they took home between RM10 and RM30 today. For many riders this is their only source of income and they are saddened by the situation now.

These days beca riders have plenty of free time. 

Plastic flowers such as this one add colour to the beca.

Comments

justmytwocents said…
It is really sad that these beca riders, at their ripe old age, have no other avenue to turn to but to rely on what's been feeding their families for decades. I don't think they can try other jobs because their area of specialization has become etched into their lives. Plus, they would not still be working if their children can support them.
FAEZAH ISMAIL said…
Thank you. I totally agree with you.
AthirahYusuh said…
Hi, may I know which street in Penang I could find these beca riders? I'm organizing a trip for 40 students and am planning to include a beca ride.

Regards,
Athirah.
FAEZAH ISMAIL said…
Hi, I am sorry for this delay. I have been away. Thanks for dropping by here. You can find many beca riders parked near Cititel Hotel which is located within Upper Penang Road. Good luck!

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