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Satisfy your curiosity


Did curiosity kill the cat?

It appears that the Union of Concerned Scientists does not believe that to be true.

Instead, it argues for "scientific curiosity" because that "is the key to solving our world's most crucial environmental, health and security problems -- such as global warming".

The grouping of scientists accuses those with "a vested interest in denying global warming" of "trying to kill the public's curiosity and thus squelch the truth".

"Scientists are curious for life," states the Union and it pleads the cause of supporting curiosity and urges us to start by being members of the grouping. 

We should take a leaf from Union's book.

"Curiosity killed the cat" is an idiom meaning to tell somebody not to ask questions or try to find out about things that do not concern them.

That is appropriate for personal affairs but in all other matters we, like the children in our midst, should show curiosity about everything.

Why should it ever stop? When my niece was four she wanted to know "why her shadow was following her?" I was amazed at her ability to notice things around her. She is now in her early twenties and she continues to ask the "shadow"-type questions.

Many questions about life remain unanswered. It is time to dig up the truth. "Curiosity about the world is the beginning of knowledge -- and science", notes Union.

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