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When peace descends on me

Sadness is everywhere. Death, divorce, destruction and tragedy. These are among the things that make us sad. Some are able to bear their misfortunes bravely. Others, however, are too wrapped in misery to move on.

We crave for a perfect spouse, a beautiful home, plenty of money, supportive friends and relatives, lots of good luck and all those things that make us happy.

But what happens when sadnesses are more than joys. Take the man who can't seem to manage without his wife who died recently. Or the farmer who lost his vegetables as a result of flood damage. Consider the case of a battered wife whose husband treats her like trash.

Can we ever get over our troubles? This question dates back to ancient times. Early humans had to endure the elements, hunger, animals and other humans, among others before things got better.

Experience has taught me that life may seem unfair but it has also shown me that hard times will come to an end. Patience is the name of the game. An incident which wrenched at my heart six months ago doesn't feel so bad now. A misunderstanding with a beloved sibling is slowly being resolved. I have lost interest in the expensive dress that I wanted weeks ago. They say time is a great healer and I couldn't agree more.

That is why Brad Pitt's quote on happiness resonates with life's complex themes and emotions: "I think happiness is overrated. Sometimes you're happy, sometimes you're not. There's too much pressure to be happy. Being at peace is more of a goal for myself."


Indeed, people expect you to be happy all the time. They can't handle it when you're not your usual cheerful self. But you can't feel bright and cheerful and full of energy everyday. That's a fact.


Seeking peace is a more manageable aim. The golden rule of handling a crisis is to stay calm. When disaster strikes I tell myself that this will pass. I will do everything possible to mitigate its consequences but I have to persevere with difficult stituations. It is possible to create a haven of peace and tranquillity but you have to work at it.

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