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ACJC now on Facebook






The Asian City Journalist Conference (ACJC) is on Facebook.

It is called UN HABITAT’s Asian City Journalists’ Conference Group.

It is a platform for environmentally conscious journalists and associates in Asia to hook up and communicate with like-minded individuals.

Japanese architect and urban planner Shunya Susuki first proposed the idea over dinner at a traditional Japanese pub in Fukuoka City, Japan on December 13, 2009.

Present at the dinner were journalists from Japan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia.

The conversation over dinner mainly centred on establishing a space for journalists and associates connected with ACJC to create an online presence and to act as an alumni association.

That was when Susuki – who participated in ACJC as coordinating officer for UN Habitat Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (Fukuoka) prior to his transfer to Fukuoka City Hall in April this year – came up with the Facebook plan.

Everyone present enthusiastically embraced Susuki’s suggestion.

Indonesian journalist Robert Adhi Kusumaputra (KOMPAS Jakarta) volunteered to create the UN HABITAT’s Asian City Journalists’ Conference Group on Facebook.

After the dinner party, Kusumaputra, Cynthia Delgado Balana (Philippine Daily Enquirer) and Faezah Ismail (New Straits Times Malaysia) adjourned to set up the page.

Do check out the group on Facebook.







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