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Night of movie stars


Parties of the music-food-and-drink type are boring. A theme brings in originality to a party and offers a new experience for the participants besides creating lasting memories. 

Five days after the NST (New Straits Times) Annual Awards Night, employees are still talking about the party. The theme was Movie Mania and many went to great lengths to dress up as their favourite movie characters.

Three strong women journalists came dressed as Cleopatra; it was the moment to bring out their inner diva qualities. Others came as Darth Vader, The Thing and Shrek, among others. The seemingly harmless and quiet Ahmad Kushairi let his proverbial hair down and channelled the ghost of P. Ramlee's Abdul Wahub from the famous Malay movie Tiga Abdul. 


                
HOLLYWOOD MEETS MOLLYWOOD: Cleopatra (Chok Suat Ling) and Abdul Wahub (Ahmad Kushairi) strut their stuff.


EGYPTIAN QUEEN MEETS GOTH MAMA: Theresa Manavalan sports another version of Cleopatra while Rozana Sani admits to being an big fan of Morticia Addams of the Addams Family.


LOVE AT FIRST BITE:Count Dracula (K.B. Murale) hooks up with Vampire (Wan Norzita).


ODD FELLOWS: Abdul Wahub (Ahmad Kushairi) is greatly amused to see The Thing (G. Rajendran) and Darth Vader (Izwan Ismail) being so chummny.


BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS: Morticia Addams (Rozana Sani) gets up close and personal with Shrek (Mohd Rafiz) and Darth Vader (Izwan Ismail)



Pictures courtesy of Ahmad Kushairi
Compiled by Faezah Ismail and Jehan Mohd

Comments

Faezah Ismail said…
thank you very much. glad you enjoyed it.

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