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A hero's welcome

Perdana Global Peace Organisation (PGPO) members Juana Jaafar and Ram Karthigasu were given a hero's welcome on their return home.

They landed at Kuala Lumpur International Ariport slightly after 2pm today looking tired but happy to be home.

The pair were given an enthusiastic welcome as they walked out of baggage clearance towards the waiting area at the airport.



For the parents of Juana and Ram the wait is over: their children are safe and that is all that matters.

Relief is written all over Azizah Dahlan's face -- Juana's mum.

Vanaja Ramachandran says the family can rest easy: Ram is home.


 

Juana, 28, and Ram, 29, were part of the International Humanitarian Aid convoy under Viva Palestina, a British-registered charity, to Gaza.

The convoy departed London December 6, 2009 and arrived in Gaza January 6, 2010.

What an accomplishment for these young Malaysian heroes!

There will be stories to tell and books to write.

All that can wait.

They can relax safe in the knowledge that they are at home with their loving families.

Congratulations Ram and Juana!

We are very proud of you!


Comments

Unknown said…
Oh, so nice! Thanks for this, Kak F.
Unknown said…
Thanks for the opportunity!
Juana Jaafar said…
dear Kak Faezah,

sorry i missed this post. baru tengok hari ni.

thank you so much for writing this! we were proud to carry the Malaysian flag with us on our journey, but heroes we are not! eeek! we're just regular Malaysians doing our small bit for Palestine.

thank you to you, your team and NST for giving us space. Viva!

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