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Style me batik

Sultry females and bold batik prints make a lethal combination as this photo of Indonesian student Cynthia Chaerunissa shows.
She is wearing a sexy, one-shoulder dress which is fashioned from zebra striped batik by student designer Stacia Andani, also from Indonesia.
Chaerunissa modelled the outfit at a fashion show organised by students at LimKokWing University of Creative Technology, Cyberjaya campus.
Both Chaerunissa (mass communications) and Andani are students at the institution.
The snazzy presentation howled Animal Print as 49 designers -- fourth and fifth semester students from Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, Botswana, Indonesia -- revealed their creations.
The grey and black toga-style robe looks great on the model: she reminds me of Indonesian singer/songwriter Anggun.
Batik is terrific for many reasons: you can style it casual or glamorous, among others.
Women and men in Malaysia have been wearing batik for a very long time and, yes, I am a fan!
See the YOU section of the New Straits Times (June 20, 2009) for more on the fashion show.
Photo: LimKokWing University of Creative Technology.

Comments

Anonymous said…
It will be nice to see batik worn by a glamorous star on the red carpet at some high-profile event. It may be possible because Malaysia has already proven she can produce world-class designers like Zang Toi and Jimmy Choo, and all one needs is to get a star to wear a batik creation by such a designer. Anyway, kudos to the Limkokwing University for the fine efforts and initiatives in producing creative talents in our midst.

O.C. Yeoh

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